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Multikicker and Card Of The Month

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About Riccardo Tessitori

Riccardo Tessitori
Riccardo Tessitori

Riccardo Tessitori is a level 5 judge from Italy; he judged more than 50 professional events, headjudged 10 Grand Prix and has just started headjudging Pro Tours, such as:

  • Pro Tour Kyoto 2009
  • Pro Tour Austin 2009
  • GP Paris 2008

Hello everybody!

2010 has started and, as we do every year, we need to decide our goals for the year. What about “Qualifying for Worlds”? See you in Chiba, Japan, on the 12th of December (that will also be my birthday) for the 2010 Worlds final!

User Questions

Question from AbbaDigital

If I counter a spell that has cascade, does the Cascade ability for that card still happen?

Answer

The complete rule for Cascade is: “When you cast this spell, exile cards from the top of your library until you exile a nonland card whose converted mana cost is less than this spell’s converted mana cost. You may cast that card without paying its mana cost. Then put all cards exiled from the game this way that weren’t cast on the bottom of your library in a random order”.

When I play a spell with Cascade, the ability triggers before we receive priority (before you can counter the spell); when you have the opportunity to counter the spell, there are two objects on the stack: the original spell below and the Cascade ability above. Just like all the other abilities, the Cascade ability exists independently from its source and will resolve even if its source is countered or exiled. Yes, Cascade is quite strong.

Questions Of The Week

Let’s start with an announcement: The experiment of adding a rules mistake in each article is over; new year, new habits; I will make sure that you enjoy and comment my articles, by talking about cheating and how to prevent your opponent from cheating you, starting in two weeks.

First, the rules mistake from the last article:

Question

I play Hex on six creatures controlled by my opponent; in response, my opponent sacrifices a Mogg Fanatic I targeted; will Hex kill the other five?

Wrong Answer

No. Targets must be legal both on announcement and on resolution; because Hex has “six creatures” as target, it will be countered on resolution because “five creatures” is not a legal “six creatures target”.

Correct Answer

Yes. To be able to cast Hex, you need six legal targets. When it resolves, it will destroy all the targeted creatures, even if one of them left the battlefield. A spell that has targets gets countered on resolution only if all of its targets become illegal.

Question

Can I pay a kicker cost multiple times?

Answer

Kicker is an additional cost that can be paid only once; replicate (from Guildpact) and multikicker (from Worldwake) can be paid many times, as long as you have enough mana.

Question

My opponent attacks me with a Goblin Chieftain and three Raging Goblins; I block the Chieftain with a 2/2; how much damage will I take?

Answer

All combat damage is assigned simultaneously and it will resolve as it was assigned; even if the Raging Goblins will be 1/1 creatures afterwards, they assigned 2 damage each and will deal 2 damage each, for a total of six. If your 2/2 creature had first strike, the Raging Goblins would have assigned only 1 damage each, because regular combat damage is assigned and dealt after first strike damage is assigned and dealt.

Question

My opponent casts a kicked Burst Lightning; I cast Twincast on it; how many damage will I deal?

Answer

When you copy a spell, you copy “all of it”, choices, modes and additional costs included. Your Twincast will put a copy of a kicked Burst Lightning on the stack and it will deal 4 damage.

Question

My opponent casts an Eternal Witness; after it enters the battlefield but before its ability resolves, I use my Shapesharer to make it a copy of the Witness; will I be allowed to return a card from my graveyard to my hand?

Answer

No. Eternal Witness has an ability that triggers “when it enters the battlefield”; your Shapesharer is already on the battlefield. If you cast a Clone and choose to copy an Eternal Witness, you would have a Cloned Eternal Witness entering the battlefield and you would be able to return a card from your graveyard to your hand.

Question

What happens if I play a creature with Cascade but there is no card with a lower mana cost in my deck?

Answer

When the Cascade ability will resolve, you will exile all your deck, find nothing, shuffle your deck, and put it back where it was.

Card Of The Month

Here you have a new section. In the first article of each month, I will describe in length a single card; where it is played, how it interacts with other cards, and any special information about it; the first article of each month will contain a tournament situation too. In the second article of each month, I will describe in-depth how somebody could cheat; how it is done and how to prevent your opponent from cheating you; the second article of each month will contain a rules quiz too.

Hypergenesis

Hypergenesis created one of the most special and powerful strategies in the current Extended format.

The Deck

Hypergenesis by Evangelos Papatsarouchas (PT Austin 2009)

This is the Hypergenesis deck played by Evangelos Papatsarouchas at Pro Tour Austin. It forms part of my feature article:

Austin Aftermath

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Hypergenesis
Versions:
Time Spiral (Foil)

A general Hypergenesis deck is the following:

  • Hypergenesis
  • 3 mana cost spells with cascade; it doesn’t matter what the spell does, the important thing is that it costs as little as possible and has cascade
  • Very powerful creatures, enchantments and artifacts; it doesn’t matter if their cost is enormous, the important thing is that they have an immediate impact on the game as soon as they enter the battlefield. Some examples are Progenitus (protected from everything and able to win in two turns), Akroma, Angel of Wrath, Iona, Shield of Emeria (able to stop monocolored decks), Angel of Despair, and Sundering Titan.
  • Multicolor lands and special mana sources like Simian Spirit Guide, to be able to cast any cascade spell without mana problems.

The Strategy

The strategy is very simple; you need to cast as soon as possible one of the spells with cascade; thanks to the cascade ability, you reveal cards until you find Hypergenesis that is the only card in your deck that costs less than 3. Now, you are able to put on the battlefield all the powerful creatures you have in your hand; it doesn’t matter that your opponent will be able to do the same, because your creatures will surely be much more powerful.

No Mana Cost

Hypergenesis has no mana cost, like all the cards with suspend. You won’t be able to cast it from your hand because you can’t pay a non existing cost, but you will be able to cast it thanks to an effect that allows you to cast a spell “without paying its mana cost” like suspend, cascade, Mind’s Desire…

If you reveal Hypergenesis with cascade, but an effect like the one created by a Meddling Mage prevents you from casting Hypergenesis, the card will be put at the bottom of your library with the other cards you removed from the game with cascade. Its converted mana cost, when requested by Dark Confidant, Spell Blast and similar cards, is zero. Chalice of the Void with zero counters will counter Hypergenesis. Hypergenesis would be colorless, but it has an ability that says “Hypergenesis is green”. This is a “Characteristic-Defining Ability”, which works in every zone; Hypergenesis is green in your graveyard, in your library, in your hand…

Teferi, Mage of Zhalfir
Versions:
Time Spiral (Foil)

Hypergenesis And Timing Restrictions

Hypergenesis can be suspended at any time you could cast a sorcery. A card like Quicken, that allows you to cast a sorcery at any time you could cast an instant, will allow you to suspend Hypergenesis at any time you could cast an instant. The interaction with Teferi, Mage of Zhalfir is interesting; when you cast a spell with cascade, the spell is put on the stack and the cascade ability goes on top of it; cascade allows you to ignore all timing restrictions and therefore allows you to cast sorceries and creatures even if the stack is not empty; on the other hand, your opponent’s Teferi allows you to cast spells only when you could cast a sorcery, that means on your turn and when the stack is empty. These two effects are conflicting; the effect that “wins” is the most restricting one: Teferi prevents cascade from working.

Putting Permanents On The Battlefield

Everything that enters the battlefield is not cast. Enchantments can be assigned to creatures with shroud. Permanents enter the battlefield individually, not all together; if you put a creature on the battlefield, your opponent will be able to put an enchantment like Pacifism on it. Permanents enter the battlefield during the resolution of Hypergenesis; state-based actions are checked after Hypergenesis finished resolving (the “legend rule” applies only after Hypergenesis finished resolving). All the enters-the-battlefield triggered abilities trigger during the resolution, but they are put on the stack and any target is chosen when Hypergenesis finishes resolving (if you put an Angel of Despair on the battlefield, you will be able to choose as target even a permanent that is put on the battlefield after your Angel); if multiple abilities triggered, all the active player’s abilities are put on the stack first (and therefore will resolve last) followed by the non active player’s abilities (that will resolve first).

Active-player Non-active-player Rule

You play Hypergenesis and you put on the battlefield an Angel of Despair; its ability triggers but isn’t put on the stack yet; your opponent puts on the battlefield an Oblivion Ring; its ability triggers but isn’t put on the stack yet. Hypergenesis finishes resolving and is put in the graveyard; both triggered abilities are about to be put on the stack. The first ability is yours; you choose to destroy the Oblivion Ring. The second ability is your opponent’s; with his Oblivion Ring, he chooses to exile your Angel. The first ability to resolve is the last put on the stack; your Angel will be exiled. The second ability to resolve is the first put on the stack; the Oblivion Ring will be destroyed. Now, the Oblivion Ring second ability triggers; when it resolves, your Angel will return to the battlefield and you will be able to destroy a second permanent!!

Ok, let’s now switch the two cards: You play Hypergenesis and you put on the battlefield an Oblivion Ring; its ability triggers but isn’t put on the stack yet; your opponent puts on the battlefield an Angel of Despair; its ability triggers but isn’t put on the stack yet. Hypergenesis finishes resolving and is put in the graveyard; both triggered abilities are about to be put on the stack. The first ability is yours; you choose to exile the Angel. The second ability is your opponent’s; with his Angel of Despair, he chooses to destroy your Oblivion Ring. The first ability to resolve is the last put on the stack; your Oblivion Ring will be destroyed. Now, the second ability of Oblivion Ring triggers; since it hasn’t exiled anything yet, it will have no effect. The last ability to resolve is the first put on the stack; the Angel will be exiled forever.

Tournament Situation

Mindslaver

This section talks about funny situations that happened during tournaments or technical aspects of special situations that are not “just rules”. Today, we are going to talk about how Mindslaver and Academy Ruins can lock your opponent and make you win even if the round is about to finish.

How To Lock Your Opponent With Mindslaver And Academy Ruins

Mindslaver is an artifact that costs six mana. Its ability allows you to control your opponent’s next turn; the ability costs four mana.

Academy Ruins is a land with an ability that allows you to put on top of your deck your Mindslaver from your graveyard; the ability costs two mana (one blue and one colorless). If you have 12 mana, you will be able in each of your turns to “Return the Mindslaver from the graveyard to the library, draw it, cast it, use it”; this way, you will be able to control your opponent’s turns until the end of the game and win by decking him; since he will be able to play normally during your turn, you will always tap all his lands and cast any zero cost spell and activate any zero cost ability to make sure that he will be defenseless until the end.

The only problem comes when the time in the round is about to finish, because you need to actually draw and discard all the cards from his library. The shortcuts you are allowed to use are: “I will keep my lands tapped because I will always Ruin-Draw-Slaver-Sacrifice”; this way you won’t lose time with your cards. “I will keep tapped your lands because I will always tap them for mana; I will keep tapped any creature with an activated ability that just requires tapping”; this way you won’t lose time with his permanents. What you will need to do is to make his hand go to seven cards; then you will need to physically draw each of the cards from his library and discard one per turn (no, you can’t just flip his library all at once); just make sure not to discard cards that get shuffled in the library (like Darksteel Colossus), otherwise you will lose a lot of time because your opponent will have the right to shuffle his own deck! This entire process will take less than a minute and you will win very quickly even if your opponent doesn’t concede immediately. Your opponent has the right to ask you to describe your loop, and you will need to explain it (no, saying “I won” isn’t a good explanation ^__^); if you describe the loop and your opponent disagrees with the shortcuts I stated above, you will just need to call a judge who will authorize you to use the shortcuts; the judge will probably ask you to explain your Mindslaver loop again but you shouldn’t worry about the time passing, because the judge will assign you extra time for the time you spent talking to him (it’s like a rule saying “calling a judge pauses the time”). The only real problem is if time finishes and the game goes to the five additional turns; even if you are invincible, you really need to deck your opponent and you really need more turns; if the time is over and you already are in the additional turns, the only way you will win is to convince your opponent to concede the game; he will surely know that you would have needed just an extra minute and he will surely know that conceding is a very sporting action, but you can’t take for granted that your opponent will be so sporting, because a tournament is a competition and we can’t blame a player who doesn’t concede.

Think about it: You won the first game and time finishes when your opponent is about to win the second game; would YOU concede and draw or would you take the win?

Ask the Judge

You can already submit all your questions for the next installment of Ask the Judge:

Ask the Judge Now!

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You have the unique opportunity to ask Level 5 judge Riccardo Tessitori all the questions you want to!

Thanks for reading, I hope you enjoyed this article and I’m looking forward to reading any comments you have.

Riccardo

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